Author Archives: libbywatson

About libbywatson

Dr Libby Watson is a Clinical Psychologist. She completed her Professional Doctorate at the University of East London (UEL), where she received the School of Psychology's research prize, and obtained her BSc in Psychology (with first-class honours) from the University of Sheffield. Libby is a Lecturer on the BACP accredited BSc Counselling programme at UEL. She also works as an Associate Lecturer at Birkbeck. Whilst adopting an integrative approach to her work, she also specialises in: Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT) including 'third-wave' approaches; Cognitive Analytic Therapy (CAT); physical health (pain management, obesity and long-term health conditions); and qualitative research methods (specifically IPA). She also holds an honorary post in the psychotherapy department at St Thomas's Hospital.

Think Negative! Reframing Positivethink…

Does anyone else get a bit fed up of the whole “just think positive” mantra? I am sure if you are looking for work, feeling unfulfilled in your career, or finding yourself at a crossroads in life and searching for … Read More »

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Reach for the stars (but don’t be dazzled by the brightest)

When deciding on a career or next step in the array of work and/or study opportunities, it’s logical and reasonable to ask the question: What would you like to do? This can be easy for some to answer, but it’s … Read More »

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Bitter Sweet Rejection

Rejecting rejection Let’s face it, nobody likes to be rejected. Whether a response to a course or job application or a journal submission – a rejection can make those steps of the career ladder feel especially slippery or wobbly underfoot. … Read More »

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Dealing with The Interview Daemon.

Some people enjoy interviews. Unfortunately, others can fall prey to The Interview Daemon. Signs that this daemon has visited include: –          A state of temporary catatonia characterised by a wide-eyed expression and mind-blankness –          Florid speech of a tangential nature … Read More »

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A pessimist is never disappointed…

This used to be a mantra of mine when I was younger. It seemed so logical – expecting the worst would not only mean you were prepared for it, but would also lead to pleasant relief were a more positive … Read More »

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Cycles of learning and development, all year round…

As I crawl out from what feels like some Christmas hibernation period back into the ‘real world’ I find myself reflecting on how different points of the year can echo different stages of learning and development… December and the run … Read More »

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I tried to think of a funny title for this one, but I couldn’t: Humour and job seeking.

Standing out from the crowd We don’t all have to do stand-up comedy to stand out, but humour in the right way and at certain moments can be helpful in getting noticed among the reams of applications and potential candidates … Read More »

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Presenting yourself, not just your presentation…

In order to discern among highly competent and suitable applicants, selection procedures are increasingly choosing mixed methods of recruitment: presentations, assessment centres (comprising various tasks and group activities), even psychometric tests… You may find your initial excitement at gaining an … Read More »

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Volunteering: for love not money

Volunteering, like charity-giving, is abound in positive connotations; after all, it’s the giving of our time (something precious and in even more short-supply than our money?). Here I have sought to explore barriers, benefits and the breadth of volunteering opportunities … Read More »

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No, square pegs don’t fit into round holes: Choose a different shaped hole rather than ‘reshape your edges’.

In work, as in life, humans have an innate drive to ‘fit in’; fitting in can lead to praise, recognition and give us a boost to our self-esteem. But who says, for example, that a square person has to fit … Read More »

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