Category Archives: Teaching Tips

Interview with Marcos Benevides: Extensive Reading (Part 1)

The 5th Extensive Reading conference is taking place this weekend in Nagoya, but what exactly is ‘Extensive Reading’, and how can it be utilized by teachers and learners of English? I interviewed Marcos Benevides, an Extensive Reading advocate, and a … Read More »

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A TEFL box of tricks

Props and accessories can be very useful in the TEFL classroom. Today, I’d like to share with you my “TEFL box of tricks” – the essential items I take to every class. 1. Name cards I have found name cards … Read More »

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Choosing language role models carefully

The demand for native-speaker teachers is high There is no doubt that the demand for native-speaker teachers of English in Japan, Asia, and the rest of the world is high. In many cases, the only requirement for getting an English … Read More »

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Using students’ L1 in the English language classroom

A perennial debate in the TEFL world is whether and to what extent teachers should use their students’ L1 in the classroom. In the case of English teachers in Japan then, then question is: should we use Japanese in the … Read More »

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Promoting speaking fluency

Becoming a more fluent speaker of English is an important goal for the majority of English language learners. In this article, the concept of ‘speaking fluency’ is briefly defined, and four methods shown to promote speaking fluency are discussed. The … Read More »

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Freelance TEFL opportunities; a refreshing alternative to teaching classes of kids

As 9 year old Pedro dangled my bag out of the 3rd floor window in Portugal menacingly, I regretted 2 things; firstly, that I hadn’t taken my bag with me when I slipped out of class to photocopy something and, … Read More »

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Working as an ALT in Japan – 5 Tips

Assistant Language Teachers (ALTs) work in elementary schools, junior high schools and high schools in Japan. The basic idea is that a native speaker (usually of English) supports the Japanese teacher (ditto) in the classroom. Aside from Eikaiwa teaching, ALT … Read More »

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